Building The Future

Sergei Tchoban formed SPEECH with Sergey Kuznetsov to create a showroom for architectural drawings. The new museum will mostly showcase art of the Tchoban Foundation Collection, but also invite temporary exhibits from leading cultural institutions around the world.

The striking construction is extended from a fire-wall and latches onto a row of typical old Berlin houses. The Museum for Architectural Drawing is a four-storey solid corpus with a glass floor stacked on top. The profile of the four floors is reminiscent of casually piled up blocks. The building’s silhouette is created by a regression and progression of façade elements, and demonstrates a freedom of form that relates to the conventions of the neighboring historic Berlin buildings and yet is unorthodox and minimalist in its gesture.

The choice of materials, the way it is designed and the powerful expression of its formal language makes it an exceptional example of contemporary architecture right here in Berlin. The museum has a floor area of around 490 square metres, and contains an entrance area, two exhibition rooms, the museum depository and a conference room.

For having a first look from inside the Museum for Architectural Drawing will open its doors on the 4th June 2013 - Pfefferberg Berlin.

(via)


The EXPERIMENTDAYS is kind of a conference about urban developments, which is running in Berlin the next days. So, if you are in town between the 15th - 23rd September you should check it out!
"The EXPERIMENTDAYS are a platform for cooperative housing projects, ideas and actors of creative sustainability in order to understand the city as a designed living space."
The program sounds quite promising - look up your favorite workshops, discussions or presentations here. In conjunction with the conference the topic-related book “CoHousing Cultures: Handbook for self-organized, community-oriented and sustainable housing” is going to be released, which might be interesting for urban developers:

"This book illustrates a colorful diversity of European examples including a cooperative’s barrier-free renovation of an old school in Berlin, collective housing for the 40+ generation in Stockholm and passive architecture planned by and for immigrants in Brussels."
Sounds like some interesting days in Berlin. Credits for promoting this event goes out to Tim Nebert (Urban Designer).

The EXPERIMENTDAYS is kind of a conference about urban developments, which is running in Berlin the next days. So, if you are in town between the 15th - 23rd September you should check it out!

"The EXPERIMENTDAYS are a platform for cooperative housing projects, ideas and actors of creative sustainability in order to understand the city as a designed living space."

The program sounds quite promising - look up your favorite workshops, discussions or presentations here. In conjunction with the conference the topic-related book “CoHousing Cultures: Handbook for self-organized, community-oriented and sustainable housing” is going to be released, which might be interesting for urban developers:

"This book illustrates a colorful diversity of European examples including a cooperative’s barrier-free renovation of an old school in Berlin, collective housing for the 40+ generation in Stockholm and passive architecture planned by and for immigrants in Brussels."

Sounds like some interesting days in Berlin. Credits for promoting this event goes out to Tim Nebert (Urban Designer).


I am going to start a new category, which will feature self-experienced tours to places of interesting architecture or construction-related environments. The first issue is about visiting an abandoned theme park, which was like visiting a whole new planet. It felt like being the only human being on that planet discovering traces of a former civilization from a long time ago. This is no place situated somewhere outside of nowhere - it is a place right in Berlin, namely Spreepark and it shows what happens to lost places and buildings, which were given back to nature.











The former theme park features a rich and spectacular history. It was back in the days the only theme park in the DDR with 1.5 million visitors, yearly. It was the main attraction for families and their kids. After the DDR was over, the park was sold to the private investor Norbert Witte. Berlin wasn’t informed that much about this guy, otherwise they would have known, that he already ran some attractions in Hamburg and one of them caused a bad accident with seven people dead and twenty ones injured. He wanted to start over again in Berlin by beginning a new successful life, but things got even worser. In the beginning everything was all good and the park flourished, but in 1997 the park went insolvent after the entrance prices needed to be increased and the lack of parking-spots couldn’t be solved. This ends in liabilities of 20 million DM (Deutsche Mark) for Norbert Witte. He decided then to flew over night with his whole family and shipped six attractions in twenty containers to Peru.











After living in exile, trying to start over again and realizing that nothing worked out and his family was nearly broke he devised a plan. He wanted to return and pay back his liabilities. Therefore he had the glorious idea to smuggle 180kg of cocaine in one of his attractions to Germany. Of course, he got caught by the police in Germany, whereas his son was arrested by authorities in Peru. Norbert Witte was sentenced to seven years in jail and his son got twenty years and is still sitting somewhere in Peru. 







After that tradegy the park was never ever opened again. Further, no investors could be found willing to buy the land with all the liabilities. It is getting harder and harder to start something new there because of the spectacular take-over by nature. This place became a magical spot for discovering a wild flourishing vegetation. In the park plants are growing, which can only be found there - in whole Germany. Today, filmmakers from all over the world are shooting there and it is possible to book photo-tours to that inspiring place. I recommend to watch the movie Achterbahn for more information.
(All images are released under CC BY-SA 3.0 unless stated otherwise.)

I am going to start a new category, which will feature self-experienced tours to places of interesting architecture or construction-related environments. The first issue is about visiting an abandoned theme park, which was like visiting a whole new planet. It felt like being the only human being on that planet discovering traces of a former civilization from a long time ago. This is no place situated somewhere outside of nowhere - it is a place right in Berlin, namely Spreepark and it shows what happens to lost places and buildings, which were given back to nature.

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I never consciously noticed the brutalist architecture in Berlin, but when seeing these great photos by Finding Berlin it’s like: “Oh wow, true - we have these buildings here, I can remember.” Brutalist architecture is a style of architecture which flourished from the 1950s to the mid 1970s, spawned from the modernist architectural movement. Examples are typically very linear, fortresslike and blockish, often with a predominance of concrete construction. In other words:

"These build­ings looked like space­ships. Not the styl­ish ones from sev­eral sci-fi movies, more like the rough ver­sion as in Battle­ship Galactica. Con­crete space­ships, built for yearn­ing soci­ety that watched the first man walk­ing on the moon and felt the future would be near." 

Hop over and see more nice photos:Finding Berlin - Berlin’s brutalist Architecture

I never consciously noticed the brutalist architecture in Berlin, but when seeing these great photos by Finding Berlin it’s like: “Oh wow, true - we have these buildings here, I can remember.” Brutalist architecture is a style of architecture which flourished from the 1950s to the mid 1970s, spawned from the modernist architectural movement. Examples are typically very linear, fortresslike and blockish, often with a predominance of concrete construction. In other words:

"These build­ings looked like space­ships. Not the styl­ish ones from sev­eral sci-fi movies, more like the rough ver­sion as in Battle­ship Galactica. Con­crete space­ships, built for yearn­ing soci­ety that watched the first man walk­ing on the moon and felt the future would be near." 

Hop over and see more nice photos:
Finding Berlin - Berlin’s brutalist Architecture


July 04, 2012 at 10:36

Tags: Finding Berlin Brutalist Architecture Berlin

Permalink / 8 Notes



"Google Campus is a seven storey co-working and event space in the centre of London’s Tech City, otherwise known as Silicon Roundabout. The project, run by Google UK aims to fuel the success of London’s tech start up community."

Am I the only one who things that the new Google Campus is looking like a bunker spreading no coziness? The lack of natural lights and the (way too ambitious) industrial design just looks like a colorful jail. I mean, I like rough industrial design, but with a combination of cozy materials plus lots of daylight - I found very less of these attributs in there. Maybe the photographs are not able to collect the real atmosphere, but it seems like a place I would not work in. By the way there are several other tech-hubs popping up around the globe. Start-Up investor JMES and Berlin’s beloved child SoundCloud teamed up for realizing “The Factory" in the heart of Berlin. Interesting to me is the architecture, as it looks similar to the all-so-hip industrial design approaches everywhere. As I understood it correctly these hubs should engage the interaction between start-ups in the first place, which means in the end a better infrastructure and faster growth of ideas. Well, that is a good move, but the best programmers, engineers, designers, etc. will move where they feel comfortable. Architecture of workspaces could be the icing on the cake in a hard-fought battle for talents. Hey Google London: You need more daylight!
Interesting reads:
TechCrunch - Berlin’s Startup Innovators Create A Factory To Call Their OwnArchDaily - The Next Silicon Valley(s)

"Google Campus is a seven storey co-working and event space in the centre of London’s Tech City, otherwise known as Silicon Roundabout. The project, run by Google UK aims to fuel the success of London’s tech start up community."

Am I the only one who things that the new Google Campus is looking like a bunker spreading no coziness? The lack of natural lights and the (way too ambitious) industrial design just looks like a colorful jail. I mean, I like rough industrial design, but with a combination of cozy materials plus lots of daylight - I found very less of these attributs in there. Maybe the photographs are not able to collect the real atmosphere, but it seems like a place I would not work in. By the way there are several other tech-hubs popping up around the globe. Start-Up investor JMES and Berlin’s beloved child SoundCloud teamed up for realizing “The Factory" in the heart of Berlin. Interesting to me is the architecture, as it looks similar to the all-so-hip industrial design approaches everywhere. As I understood it correctly these hubs should engage the interaction between start-ups in the first place, which means in the end a better infrastructure and faster growth of ideas. Well, that is a good move, but the best programmers, engineers, designers, etc. will move where they feel comfortable. Architecture of workspaces could be the icing on the cake in a hard-fought battle for talents. Hey Google London: You need more daylight!

Interesting reads:

TechCrunch - Berlin’s Startup Innovators Create A Factory To Call Their Own
ArchDaily - The Next Silicon Valley(s)


It’s nice and strange at the same time to see that such an old and historical bunker is owned by a private person in Berlin. The apartment on the roof must be spectacular and the huge art-collection by  Christian Boros situated in the bottom floors is worth to see. It’s possible to visit the bunker within small groups via application. More on their website. 
freundevonfreunden:

The Bunker
Cursing through the web, we have come across this insightful article on the Bunker, or Reichsbahnbunker the 5-storey converted bomb shelter from advertising entrepreneur, Christian Boros who we had the pleasure of filming inside his lofty home above the Bunker.
“ Origninally designed by Karl Bonatz, under the direction of Albert Speer (Hitler’s chief architect), it was built in the early 1940′s. The Bunker’s purpose was to shelter some 3,000 Reichbahn passengers (German National Railway). Since then the building has been used as a prisioner-of-war camp, a warehouse for textiles, dry and tropical fruit and a notorious hardcore techno and fetish club; today it is home to the Boro’s and their art collection.”
Have a glance at the interview we did of Karen and Christian Boros in their lovely home above the Bunker.
(via alessandrapeach )

It’s nice and strange at the same time to see that such an old and historical bunker is owned by a private person in Berlin. The apartment on the roof must be spectacular and the huge art-collection by  Christian Boros situated in the bottom floors is worth to see. It’s possible to visit the bunker within small groups via application. More on their website

freundevonfreunden:

The Bunker

Cursing through the web, we have come across this insightful article on the Bunker, or Reichsbahnbunker the 5-storey converted bomb shelter from advertising entrepreneur, Christian Boros who we had the pleasure of filming inside his lofty home above the Bunker.

“ Origninally designed by Karl Bonatz, under the direction of Albert Speer (Hitler’s chief architect), it was built in the early 1940′s. The Bunker’s purpose was to shelter some 3,000 Reichbahn passengers (German National Railway). Since then the building has been used as a prisioner-of-war camp, a warehouse for textiles, dry and tropical fruit and a notorious hardcore techno and fetish club; today it is home to the Boro’s and their art collection.”

Have a glance at the interview we did of Karen and Christian Boros in their lovely home above the Bunker.

(via alessandrapeach )


April 25, 2012 at 16:05

Tags: Inspiration Architecture Christian Boros Berlin

Permalink / 15 Notes